Solutions For PIRP Fraud | Brooklyn Covered

Tell you what, I’d really like to know how many yellow taxi and livery car drivers actually take the PIRP classes they are supposed to complete every two years. I know I’d feel a lot better they actually sat through a class, and didn’t just do a “walk in and walk out” class.

Solutions For Fraudulent PIRP Activity

Before we examine solutions for PIRP fraud ( PIRP is the acronym for the New York State-approved Point / Insurance Reduction Program), I’d like to review some of the problems, both real and potential, for people getting credit for classes they never took.

  1. New York State licensed drivers who are the primary operators of a motor vehicle, receive a minimum 10% discount on their automobile insurance. These discounts are in a real sense a reward for supposedly improved knowledge of New York State vehicle and traffic laws, and safe driving techniques. When combined, these increased skill sets should, in the words of Empire Safety Council, one of New York State’s leading PIRP class providers, help drivers, “Survive the driving experience.”
  2. Drivers who would otherwise lose their licenses continue to drive on our streets and highways. Their poor attitudes towards the responsible operation of a motor vehicle, not modified through actual class attendance and participation creates an even greater threat with their feeling of having “beaten the system.” Tell you what, I’d really like to know how many yellow taxi and livery car drivers actually take the PIRP classes they must complete every two years. I know I’d feel a lot better if they actually sat through a class, and didn’t just do a “walk in and walk out” class.

Both scenarios are, in a word, frightening. Should fraudulent activity in the program continue, there is the real possibility New York State could make attending PIRP classes every three years a requirement for enjoying the privilege of being a NYS licensed driver. Without any accompanying discounts or point reduction. And, with you paying for the classes out-of-pocket.

Now, don’t scoff at the idea the state could do just that. As a licensed NYS insurance agent and broker, I must complete 15 hours of continuing education , either through self-study or actual classroom attendance, every two years. Should I fail to do so, I will lose my licenses.

As an Income Tax Preparer, I must now complete 15 hours of income tax continuing education every year to qualify for my federal Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN). On top of this, I must study for and pass an exam to become a Registered Tax Return Preparer (RTRP), no later than December 31, 2013, or else I can no longer prepare income tax returns.

And yes, I pay, or will pay out-of-pocket for all the above.

So don’t think for a second we can’t lose this valuable means of legitimately lowering our premiums and reducing points on our NYS drivers licenses.

Hey, Wait A Minute. Didn’t You Promise Some Solutions?

Why, indeed I did. Here are a few solutions for PIRP fraud.

  1. Submit photocopies of each participant’s NYS drivers license in the package sent to the program providers.
  2. Require a group photograph of each class. And don’t try to tell me anyone’s camera-shy, or you can’t figure out how to use the time feature on your camera.
  3. Increase the number of random calls made to listed class participants of every class. Ask them “What do you remember about Mr. Jones?”, or “What did you think of the office decor?’, or “Where did you eat lunch?”, or “Who did you eat lunch with?”
  4. Increase spot checks to ensure classes are actually being conducted.
  5. Employ “shoppers” whose express purpose is to attend random classes and assess the content and conduct of each instructor.
  6. Increase the financial penalties for those Delivery Agents and Instructors who engage in fraudulent PIRP activities. And send some to jail, with the loss of every other state or federal license they now hold. You’d have to be a durn fool to risk everything for a few measly dollars.
  7. Finally, I’d impose severe penalties on those drivers who participate in any fraudulent PIRP activities. Again, fines and possible jail time should stop those looking for a “quick fix” for their auto insurance woes.

When enacted, you’d realize an immediate decrease in the number of student completions. It might hurt the pocketbooks of the state,  and provider agencies for a time. In the long run, however, we’d all enjoy safer roads, better able to “survive the driving experience.”

And, with all the people necessary for enforcement, we could solve a good part of the jobless problem here in New York  

Until my next post, make every day an outstanding day.

 

EITC and PIRP. Perfect Together | Brooklyn Covered

Tell you what, let’s apply the same penalties to everyone who’s ever claimed to attend and participate in a six-hour Point and Insurance Reduction Program class, but didn’t. They would lose both the 10% discount on their auto insurance, and the reduction of up to four points on their drivers license. And they would not qualify for either benefit for a period of no less than ten (10) years.

Let’s Apply EITC Penalties To PIRP

You may be wondering why I think EITC and PIRP ( Earned Income Tax Credit and Point and Insurance Program, respectively) share any similarities. Well, they don’t. At least not yet.

Under the current personal income tax law, if you claim the earned income tax credit, and it is later disallowed because you made a fraudulent claim, you lose the right to claim the EITC for ten, count ’em, ten years. Which means by the time you’re able to legitimately claim the EITC again, you’ll either be too old, or the children you would’ve used to qualify for it have children of their own.

What Types Of Penalties Should We Impose?

Tell you what, let’s apply the same penalties to everyone who’s ever claimed to attend and participate in a six-hour Point and Insurance Reduction Program class, but didn’t. They would lose both the 10% discount on their auto insurance, and the reduction of up to four points on their driver’s license. And they would not qualify for either benefit for no less than ten (10) years.

Even better, for those we catch engaging in fraudulent actions, let’s give them two (2) points for the first infraction, three points for the second, license suspension for a period of not less than six months for the third, and license revocation for no less than a year for the fourth infraction for as long as they have the privilege of a New York State Drivers license.

If they’re crazy enough to try it more than four (4) times? Well, you can’t fix stupid.

Mandate that those so caught must actually attend an actual  PIRP class at least once every three (3) years, without the benefit of getting either point reduction or a discount on their insurance. Talk about your new assessment!

Wait, you supposedly attended a class, and you claim to have never heard about assessments?

Are you sure you attended a full six-hour class?

So why am I venting about this today? Well, as a NYS-certified PIRP Delivery Agent and Instructor, I take great pride in making sure everyone who attends one of my classes leaves feeling;

  1. Empowered by the knowledge they’ve acquired,
  2. Confident in their ability to “survive the driving experience” or,
  3. Afraid to drive ever again. And wondering how the heck they’ve lived this long.

What really drives me nuts is when I talk to clients about an upcoming class, and they tell me they did it the easy way. They are not ashamed to tell me they go to certain agencies where they pay about $100.00, copy the answers to the driving test, fill out a few forms.

No six-hour class. Heck, I’m surprised if it takes more than six (6) minutes to “complete” a course this way. This is dangerous for you and anyone else near the road. For insurance companies, they are losing premium dollars. For the driving and walking publics, you’re sharing the road with people who shouldn’t legally have drivers licenses. And the United States Treasury loses because these crooks require payment in cold, hard, cash. Just imagine how much taxable income is not being declared.

Isn’t it just amazing how I can make my wild titles work out at the end?

How Do We Prevent This Type of Fraud?

In my next post, I’ll outline the methods I’d use to stifle the growth of this felony activity.

What Ever Happened To The Series On Force-Placed Homeowners Insurance?

Not only will that series continue, I’ve got some new wrinkles for you. Stay tuned.

Handheld Electronic Device Law Changes | Brooklyn Covered

While illegal though, the driver had to be stopped for another traffic violation in order to receive a ticket for using the handheld device. So, if you’re like many drivers I’d see on Brooklyn’s Third Avenue, heading to the Verrazano Bridge during the afternoon rush while texting, talking, checking email, and in one case playing Angry Bird, you could get away with murder. Probably the murder of some poor pedestrian, or another driver, who like me would have the blow the heck of their horn to get “Birdmans” attention before he ran into me

Stop wasting your time and money playing Powerball and Mega Millions. Just give me a digital camera so I can take pictures of drivers breaking the new Handheld Electronic Devices law. Then, I’ll upload the photographic evidence of their unlawful activity to the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles. They can send me a check for $1,000.00 for each law-breaker. Let’s see, ten (10) each day, at $1,000.00 each, that’s $10,000.00 each day, times 20 working days each month…

…Like I said, who needs Powerball of Mega? This is a sure thing.

Wait A Minute. Another New Law?

On July 12, 2011, New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo signed a new law about a drivers use of handheld electronic devices while operating a moving motor vehicle in New York State. Specifically, what once was a secondary traffic offense is now a primary offense.

What’s The Difference Between  Primary And Secondary Offenses?

Under the old law, it was illegal for a driver to use a cell phone, IPad, or other handheld electronic device for texting or talking while operating a motor vehicle, i.e., while the vehicle was in motion.

Though illegal, the driver had to be stopped for another primary traffic violation to be ticketed for using the handheld device. So, if you’re like the many drivers I see on Brooklyn’s Third Avenue, heading to the Verrazano Bridge during the afternoon rush who are engaged in texting, talking, checking email, and in one case playing Angry Bird, you could get away with murder. Probably the murder of some poor pedestrian, or another driver, who like me would blow the heck of their horn to get “Birdmans” attention before he ran into me.

The police were required to pull you over for failing to signal a lane change, speeding, or some other primary violation to smack you with a ticket for use of the handheld electronic device. So, in addition to the points and fine for the primary offense, law enforcement would also give you a ticket garnering you two (2) points and  a fine of $150.

How The Law Changed

As of July 12, 2011, law enforcement no longer needs any other reason to pull you over for violating what is now a primary offense. This means getting a ticket for three (3) points, and a fine of $150.00.

What Constitutes Illegal Activity?

Illegal activity includes holding an electronic device and:

  • Composing, sending, reading, accessing, browsing, transmitting, saving, or retrieving electronic data such as e-mail, text messages, or webpages;
  • Viewing, taking, or transmitting images, and;
  • Playing games.
How You Can Avoid A Ticket

As long as the device is attached to a surface inside your car, or is a GPS device attached to the inside of your car, you’re okay. You can also use a bluetooth earpiece if you absolutely must talk all the way home.

If you’re trying to communicate with law enforcement, the fire department, or medical personnel during an emergency, you won’t face a fine.

Who’s Exempt  From The Law?

Police officers, fire fighters or emergency vehicle drivers while they are performing their duties.

How The New Law Really Affects You

  • You’ll receive three points on your license, meaning your automobile insurance will  increase at renewal. If your insurance company decides to renew your policy. Your company may forgive an accident, but not one caused by your unlawful operation of a moving vehicle.
  • Based on the number of points already on your license, you could be required to pay annual assessments, every year for three (3) years.
  • Should you exceed the number of points New York State needs to suspend your driver’s license, you could find yourself taking the train and/or bus. Then you can talk and text all you want.

According to The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration,  5,500 people were killed and 450,000 people were injured in distracted driving crashes in the year 2009.1 Also, you’re 23 times more likely to crash if you text while driving.1 

So, stop the distracted driving. Chances are, you’ll live longer, pay less for your insurance, and only take the train and bus when you want to.

As for me, I guess it’s time to be “In it to win it.”

1.   http://distraction.gov , “Driving Safety.”

Two People Who Want To Kill Their Infant|BrooklynCovered

And the sad part? These two should-have-never-been-able-to-conceive excuses for parents would demand their insurance company provide the best care for their infant. As the child grew, they would demand the public school system provide the best possible education for their child. They would probably also demand their state and local legislators change existing estate planning laws re: Special Needs Children just so their child would benefit from greater access to lifelong services and funding.

Some Parents Treat Their Children Like They’re A Major Inconvenience

So, there we were, myself and Salvatore Cataldo, owner of the soon-to-be world-famous Cataldo’s Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria (www.cataldos54.com), at 564 Vanderbilt Avenue, standing outside of his restaurant this morning, Sunday, August 21, 2011 at approximately 11:20 am.

The sun shone brightly (the biblical rain I am listening to outside my window wasn’t falling this morning), and as Sal and I spoke, I saw what can only be described as the complete disregard for an infants well-being by what passes for parents today.

Heading north on Vanderbilt Avenue were two couples, and both fathers were responsible for transporting their babies on their bicycles. The second father was doing everything right. The child wore a protective helmet of the proper fit and size. The child was also secured in a protective bicycle seat. Even better, both Dad and Mom were wearing bicycle helmets. Great.

It was, however, Dad and Mom number 1 who made me want to run out into the street and snatch their child from their stupid grasp.

Dad number 1, you see, was carrying what looked like an infant in one of those cloth baby carriers. You know the kind I’m talking about. They’re made of cloth and designed to support the infant’s head while allowing their little arms and legs to move. Something you wouldn’t put a child older than one year of age in. They provide absolutely no protection in an accident. Worse yet, the little infant lacked any form of head protection.

Breaking The Law, Breaking The Law

Article 34, section 1238 of the New York State Vehicle and Traffic Law is quite specific about the minimum age of passenger on bicycles. It states;

Section 1238. Passengers on bicycles under one year of age prohibited; passengers and operators under fourteen years of age to wear protective headgear.   1. No person operating a bicycle shall allow a person who is under one year of age to ride as a passenger on a bicycle nor shall such person be carried in a pack fastened to the operator. A first violation of the provisions of this subdivision shall result in no fine. A second violation shall result in a civil fine not to exceed fifty dollars.

2. No person operating a bicycle shall allow a person one or more years of age and less than five years of age to ride as a passenger on a bicycle unless: (a) such passenger is wearing a helmet meeting standards established by the commissioner. For the purposes of this subdivision wearing a helmet means having a helmet of good fit fastened securely upon the head with the helmet straps; and

(b) such passenger is placed in a separate seat attached to the bicycle and such seat shall have adequate provision for retaining the passenger in place and for protecting the passenger from the moving parts of the bicycle.”

“So What?”  You Say?

Let’s imagine the worst. Both child-carrying Dads crash or fall because of  some obstruction on the roadway say,  a stone, a stick, a slippery metal road covering because of ongoing sewer rehabilitation. Even worse, they collide with a Distracted Pedestrian who’s watching a movie, texting or talking while walking.  Now Dad number 2 and his child may suffer some nicks and cuts, but should avoid suffering permanent damage to their brain cells.

Dad number 1 and his child would be a different story. The baby would have a higher chance of suffering permanent brain damage, not to mention the loss of use of one or more of its limbs. Or, the infant would die.

And the sad part? These two should-have-never-been-able-to-conceive excuses for parents would demand their health insurance company give the best care for their infant. As the child grew, they would demand the public school system provide the best possible education for their child. They would probably also demand their state and local legislators change existing estate planning laws re: Special Needs Children just so their child would benefit from greater access to lifelong services and funding.

Here’s What I Say-Deny, Deny, Deny.

Now, to his credit, Sal was trying to calm me down. Then  I gave him the reality of increased health care costs because these two “parents” didn’t love their child enough. Add to that the resources that might go to this child due to his parents foolishness, which could lead to higher taxes for us. And let’s not downplay the effect a liability suit could have on both the cost and availability of certain insurance coverages

And worse, the danger those parents placed their infant child in.

So here’s what I say: Deny.

Deny them the right to receive any medical benefits for their child.
Deny them the right to receive anything but the most basic education for their child, unless they pay for it from their own pockets.
Deny them the right to sue the city and/or utility or private firm for their failure to properly cover road hazards.
Deny them the right to sue the Distracted Pedestrian, or the driver of the car which strikes them by accident (Come on,  if they’re this dense, you know they’re running red lights on their bikes).

I do demand the law be changed. The civil fine for the first violation should be no less than one thousand dollars ($1,000.00). For a second violation of any part of the law, twenty-five hundred dollars ($2,500.00), and the impounding of their bicycles until they prove the child is properly protected and of age to be a bicycle passenger. A third violation? Removal of the child from the parents. Why? They are clearing demonstrating they love to bike more than they love their child.

Sal, once he helped me get my blood pressure down to a reasonable level, put it all into perspective. “My friend,” he said, “I can almost guarantee you nothing will ever happen to that kid. The kid whose parents do all the right things, that’s the one who will suffer. That one, nothing  will ever happen to it. And that’s the way it is.”

Let’s pray he’s right.

Child Injured in Prospect Park… | BrooklynCovered

Now, I share the roadway with joggers, walkers, in-line skaters, and cyclists. They have a buffered lane to use until the park is closed to vehicular traffic. I can’t tell you how many times I given Tour De France wanna-bes a gentle beep of the horn to let them know they are in the wrong lane, only to have them tell me to “Use the other f*****g lane, a*****e!” And that was from someone whom I’ll kindly describe as a lady.

 

…By someone who really thought they were in the Tour de France.

No Children Were Injured…

…In the writing of this blog. It is, however, only a matter of time before the headline reads, “Child Killed When Cyclists Fail To Obey Traffic Signals”, or “Cyclist Operating at a Reckless Speed Kills Innocent Child.”

What Are You Ranting About Now?

As you may or may not know, Monday to Friday, from 5 PM until 7 PM, cars are allowed to enter Prospect Park using the Grand Army Plaza entrance and use the parks interior roadway to travel all the way to the circle at Coney Island Avenue.

When my schedule allows, I enjoy taking this route. It provides me with a calming respite from the days stressors as I travel through this beautiful primordial forest. I also enjoy driving at no more than 20 mph. Believe me, this is a time in the day when I don’t want to rush. (When our schedules allow, my daughter and I enjoy taking our bicycles out for a few leisurely laps around the park. Leisurely because we often stop  for water and those heavenly ice cream bars sold near the bandshell.)

It is my habit to drive in the left hand lane. Doing this provides me with an extra microsecond of reaction time should someone dart out into the roadway. This is especially useful since so many people are enthralled by their I-Pods, I-Phones, Droids, and other distractions which could place them in great danger were I not looking out for them.

Now, I share the roadway with joggers, walkers, in-line skaters, and cyclists. They have a buffered lane to use until the park closes to vehicular traffic. I can’t tell you how many times I given Tour De France wanna-bes a gentle beep of the horn to let them know they are in the wrong lane, only to have them tell me to “Use the other f*****g lane, a*****e!” And that was from someone whom I’ll graciously describe as a lady. At least, it sounded and was shaped like a lady.

I’ve learned to let moments like this go,  since, as a NYS licensed insurance agent and broker, I am well aware of the consequences of using my vehicle as a weapon to intentionally inflict damage or harm to a person.

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, I am too pretty for prison.

The behavior which really angers me with these arrogant fools in spandex clothing is their complete disregard for the safety of pedestrians, especially little kids. On more than one occasion, I’ve stopped at the red light at the pedestrian crossing located near the baseball fields, only to watch as cyclists, too interested in keeping up their momentum, barely avoid hitting small children. On one occasion, a young mother was crossing with the light, and more than a few fools in a peloton nearly hit her and what appeared her child of no more than 2-3 years of age. Some dads leaving the baseball fields with their own children got into a shouting match with the offending cyclists, and I really thought they’d use the baseball bats to rearrange some heads.

While no one suffered any injury this time, I’ll never forget the look on that mothers face, a look of stark terror, knowing she and her small child were nearly hit, not by the cars which legally stopped for the red light. No, she and her little one were nearly done in by folk who think the park belongs only to them. Just imagine if they did ban cars from the park, anyone not speeding on a bicycle would have to leave too.

Tomorrow, Part II.

Accidents, Lies and no Videotape | BrooklynCovered

I raced outside and saw what looked to be a 1995 Panel Van with NYS plates kissing the rear bumper of a white 2007 Chrysler Station Wagon with Pennsylvania plates. The driver of the Panel Van had jumped out of his vehicle, cursing his fate, not thinking clearly enough to put his van in park. I suggested, in a loud voice, to get back in the van and put it park.

Date:  Thursday, June 23, 2011
Time:  5:oo PM
Road Surface Conditions:  Dry
Light Conditions:  Cloudy with excellent visibility

Whatever Shall I Blog About?

I was at my desk, thinking of what to blog about, (I mean, I’ve only got about five shopping bags full of notes and ideas), when I thought I heard a bomb go off outside my office.

I raced outside and saw what looked like a 1995 Panel Van with NYS plates kissing the rear bumper of a white 2007 Chrysler Station Wagon with Pennsylvania plates. The driver of the Panel Van had jumped out of his vehicle, cursing his fate, not thinking clearly enough to put his van in park. I suggested, in a loud voice, to get back in the van and put it park.

I  briefly spoke to two former Brooklynites, just in from their new home in Las Vegas for a visit. They said both cars were stopped and then, in what I can only imagine was a severe case of distracted driving, Panel Van Man hit the gas and slammed into the rear of the PA Chrysler Wagon. So hard, in fact, both the drivers and passenger side front air bags , the van’s front bumper was ripped off, and the hood bent like a piece of paper you didn’t like before you threw it away. The result of a collision which again, sounded like a bomb going off.

The driver of the PA Chrysler emerged from his vehicle, holding the back of his head and flexing his spine. When I inquired as to how he felt, he told me he had just left work early to go to a doctor’s appointment.

Call 911, Kiddo

My daughter brought out some paper and pens so the two drivers could exchange information. Why? Well, Sections 601-605 of Title VI, Article 22 of the NYS Vehicle and Traffic Law, (2007-2008 edition) covers the responsibilities of persons involved in a motor vehicle accident anywhere in the state of New York.Section 605 specifically states anyone involved in an accident where on or both parties suffer damage in excess of one thousand dollars shall report the accident in writing to the commissioner.

Your wilful failure  to report an accident or give current information is a misdemeanor creating grounds for the suspension and/or revocation of your license, registration, or both. This applies even if the driver involved is licensed, registered and insured out of state. You wouldn’t be able to legally drive anywhere in New York State.

Send In The Clowns

Why the lesson in vehicle law? Only because this is when the circus began.

The Pennsylvania plates finally made my insurance agent brain go “Click.”

“How are you feeling?”

“Okay, I guess.”

“I called the police and they should arrive soon. Are you the owner of this vehicle?” I asked.

“Yes, I am.”

“And, just between us, do you really live in Pennsylvania?”

“Uh, yeah. I’m just, uh, staying with my daughter in Brooklyn this week.”

Now, did somebody leave a dead, rotting fish in the sink for a week, or does something else smell fishy to you? Didn’t he tell me he’d just left work early to go to the doctor? Somehow, I don’t think he works, or lives in Pennsylvania.

Here’s the reality. Panel Van Man probably lacked either a valid license or current auto insurance. Chrysler Man really lives somewhere in Brooklyn, and fraudulently registers and insures his vehicle in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Panel Van Man again came over to offer PA Chrysler Man money to fix his car.

“Come on pal, we can settle this right now. How much do you want to fix your car?”

To his credit, PA Chrysler Man initially said “No, I want to call the police and get an ambulance. I don’t know if something is wrong with me, and I don’t know how bad my car is damaged. Don’t you have insurance?

“Yeah, yeah, I got insurance, but it’s high insurance. I pay real high insurance now.”

Gee, no kidding.

“I don’t want my insurance to go up. I’ll tell you what, follow me to my collision shop and I’ll fix your car for you.”

Why is it everybody responsible for an accident does body work? I mean, are they driving around looking to hit other cars so they can take them to their shops for practice? Or is business that bad?

They got down on hands and knees to examine the undercarriage of the Chrysler, then lifted the hatch and checked the interior trunk area for damage. All the while, Panel Van Man kept imploring PA Chrysler Man to take some money.

“Look, I only got $60.00. You’ll have to trust me for the rest.”

Say what? You just ram the back of another car, don’t want to call the police, and expect the other driver to ‘trust you’?

That’s when PA Chrysler Man pulled out his cell phone, began to hold the back of his head. Me, I’d have been laying on the macadam, waiting for Godot, I mean, the ambulance and the police. I’d already have my lawyer, John Dewey, of the law firm Dewey, Cheatum and Howe, on line one, and my real estate agent on line two.

Then, as if by miracle, Panel Van Man sighed, and pulled out a wad of bills which would have choked Secretariat to death. If he thought he had only $60.00, then he didn’t know how to count. He counted out a bunch of $100’s for quite some time. The first time he stopped, PA Chrysler Man shook his head as if to say, “Keep it coming fool”, and he kept on counting.

When an agreeable amount of money had chaned hands, Panel Van Man got into his vehicle lacking a legal bumper, with two deployed air bags and drove off in a cloud of smoke to strike again.

I approached PA Chrysler Man and expressed my hope he wouldn’t wake up a month from now, paralyzed from the waist down from the displaced spinal fracture he may have suffered in the accident. The same fracture the x-ray machine at the hospital would have discovered had he gone.

“There’s not enough money in the wad of bills he gave you to pay the medical and skilled nursery costs you could be facing down the road.”

He shrugged, smiled, got into his  rear bumper-damaged wagon, and drove away, happy with his unexpected payday.

Let’s just hope the rear of his car and his rear don’t fall off the same day.

Who Loses When This Happens?

Well, dear readers, it’s you and I. Us, the “I don’t need the hassle,” “Chicken livered,” and “I am too pretty for prison” honest folk who dutifully pay the proper and legal rates for auto insurance. Rates which are high because of the fraud so many other perpetrate daily.

We pay for everyone who says we’re crazy or stupid for paying so much when you can insure in Florida, Ohio, Maryland, and yes, even Pennsylvania and save yourself some money.

Just don’t get into an accident.

That’s okay though. Like I said, I’ll be glad to wait for the ambulance, talking to my lawyer on the phone.

The really good side of all of this? I finally had something fresh to post.

 

Eustace Greaves Jr, LUTCF is BrooklynCovered, a financial services representative located in Brooklyn, NY.
And all of the cool stuff happens right outside of his door.